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T.S.O.L 'The Trigger Complex' Album Review

February 8, 2017


With nearly four decades of rock and roll under their belt, alongside a grand total of nine studio albums and a shed tonne of experience tucked tightly in their pockets - West Coast punk rockers T.S.O.L (True Sounds Of Liberty) release their tenth studio album, The Trigger Complex. Original members: Ron Emory (guitar), Mike Roche (bass) and Jack Grisham (vocals), alongside new drummer Chip Hanna have returned with all guns blazing to shoot thirteen raucous songs our way that pushes the old school nostalgic sound of raw, edgy and unperfected punk rock.

 

It's safe to say that The Trigger Complex is one hell of a diverse record to say the least. Starting off with tracks like 'Give Me More' and 'Sometimes' really sets the pace for the record, as both songs are accompanied by a constant rhythm propelled by a powerful guitar, creating some mega energy levels that screams everything punk rock. On the flip side, songs like 'Don't You Want Me' really showcases the band's capability and distinctive approach with this album - taking control of all loose emotions with a blissful piano led, 4 minute chill out tune. Gently crafting melodramatic vibes, Don't You Want Me is definitely the stand out song on the record, with its extravagant sound that everyone can appreciate. 'Bats' is yet another stand out track that shines through on The Trigger Complex. Expressing all of their instrumental values, Bats is a perfect example of just how musically talented T.S.O.L really are and a thrilling end to a climatic album.

 

Jam packed full of genuine rock thirsty hits, The Trigger Complex compels a very mature sound, while not loosing their original punk rock goodness taken straight from the classic 80's scene. Although in places the album does seem to have run its course of time, listeners that can appreciate this kind of material will fall for The Trigger Complex - a true reminiscence to old school alternative music. 

Score: 7/10 

Review by Josh Bates
 

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