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Orchards - Lovecore | Album Review

March 16, 2020

 

Incorporating funky melodies with soft and bouncy riffs seems to come all too easily for Brighton based math poppers Orchards, with their debut album Lovecore offering nothing but feel-good vibes just in time for the Spring.

 

This release perpetuates the familiar groove found on previous EP Losers/Lovers from the off, with opening single ‘Sincerely Overwhelmed’ sounding optimistically erratic despite it's lyrical anxiety. Sporting a Vampire Weekend-esque style, it’s impossible to sit still whilst listening. As the album progresses, there’s little opportunity for sadness. Lucy Evers vocals are simultaneously angelic, excitable and contemplative; complimenting the band’s soft and bouncy sound with her effortlessly pure and inclusive tone. However, the clear vocal highlight comes in the form of ‘Girlfriend’, with Evers' unapologetic self-empowerment shining through. 

 

Despite the overwhelmingly positive tone, some clear melancholic lyricism can be found among the optimism. ‘Magical Thinking’ exposes a vulnerable side to Orchard’s music; Evers expressing multiple personal issues whilst maintaining the overall feel-good sound. This level of sincerity can be found throughout the release, with single ‘Social Sobriety’. The overwhelming sense of empathy proves that this release oozes a maturity that most pop releases don’t carry. Even with some underlying melancholy, this release is still extremely positive. A new bounce infused version of the classic live set staple that is  ‘Luv You 2’ undeniably takes the top spot for happiness, with the opening ‘Woo’ setting the lively tone from the off. 

 

 

 

Musically, as many will undoubtely be aware of by now,  Orchards offer an element of math rock that isn’t a common feature of modern-day pop music. Sam Rushton's erratic yet totally in time melodies paired with Evers' seamlessly effortless vocal range makes for a unique style that indie pop never knew it needed until now. As well as math-rock, strains of post-punk can be heard towards the end of the album, with ‘History’ offering an angsty bladed edge to this release; versatility is clearly no issue for Orchards.

 

To summarise, Lovecore is a release that could boost any mood; Orchards confirm that indie-pop is more relevant than ever before. 

 

Score: 8/10

 

Lovecore is out March 13th via Big Scary Monsters. You can purchase the record here.

 

Orchards will (hopefully) be on tour this Spring. Dates below. 

 

 

 

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