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God Alone - God Alone² | Album Review



Late last year, experimental Irish post-metal collective God Alone released their latest self-titled EP. Across four tracks and 32 minutes, the group displayed post-metal dynamism in a manner most experimental, with the record toying furiously with elements of frostbitten blackgaze, blistering screamo, miserable dance and sporadic pacing. What transpired was an introduction to a band utterly refusing to comply with regularity and a deep dive into the maddening mind of a band who hoisted atmosphere and creativity all above all other aspects. With that in mind it was always going to be interesting to see what God Alone would deliver next, but truthfully, it’s safe to say not a single person could of predicated this. Released October 1st via Cosmonaut and Hausa is God Alone², an electronic remixing of the record that came before it.

Yes, that is correct. God Alone and their peers within the Irish electronic scene have taken great monolithic slabs of blackened post-metal and have reimagined them as electronic club filling bangers. Admittedly so, the very notion of such a thing is absurd. According to stereotypical perception, post-metal and electronic music in it’s numerous forms are not worlds apart, but separated by galaxies. But yet, this works on a multitude of levels, with God Alone being most probably the only act able to undertake such an endeavour without it resulting in a self-righteous mess. With each track on the original EP being remixed by two different Irish music producers – an exercise resulting in eight completely unique tracks – God Alone and their peers bridge the gap between two worlds one would never thought would be connected.


As with the original EP, God Alone² is a product of juxtaposition. Throughout this release, various thematic tones, emotions, atmospheric stylings are probed and mutilated to the point of unrecognition. On one hand, God Alone² see’s the clouding atmospheres that enshrouded the original EP be refined and purified via electronic means. The opener of Doubt’s remix of ‘Feeling On Tic’ introduces such themes immediately, with the Celtic riff that pierced the original tack being reimagined as warm, tropical and idyllic. In relation, producer Actual Acid takes the anguished blackgaze rage of ‘Yes Aii’ and reworks as a deeply relaxing hypnotic bath of trip-hop soundscapes, with the once anxious keys of the source now serving as sonic repose.


As to be excepted however, on the other hand, some producers and artists have taken the intensity of the source material and heightened it through digital dictation. Designed as an acidic club sweeper, Fomorian Vein’s reworking of the initially capricious ‘Madting’ thrashes and froths with chemical possession, with distorted howls of anguish screaming over bludgeoning electronic fractals and polyrhythms. Ghosking Is Dead’s warped vision of ‘Ke-Ta’ takes a similar approach, made evident by the intensification of the unpredictability of the original material and it’s respective juddering pacing only heightens the fluctuating levels of precocious energy that permanents God Alone’s work.


Despite such producers and creatives taking God Alone’s work and warping to their will, the idiosyncratic sense of personalty that made the band originally so alluring remains intact. The aggression, anxiety and blistering sonic dynamism has been kept secure throughout the remixing process, with the producers featured within the release clearly working on the same tangent and as the band themselves. It’s the sound of a collective collaboration, with all creatives featured within the release imprinting their own identity within the tracks without ever diluting the work of others. Suppose the only thing lost in the mix is the sense of tormented misery within the EP’s original form, but with the intensity of the remix, it’s hardly a point of criticism.


It may not serve as a totally convincing introduction to post metal for EDM kids - or vice versa for that matter - but God Alone² is an irresistibly curious example of what madcap endeavours can be cooked up when likeminded artists from different worlds collaborate. Inherently unconventional yet haplessly enjoyable, it’s yet another successful experiment in boundless genre experimentation by one of post-metal’s most freethinking bands.


Score: 8/10


God Alone² is released October 1st via Cosmonaut (Digital) and Hausu (Physical). Purchase the record here.

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